Is a pet dental procedure too much for my old pet?

As pets grow old, one of the things that is important to maintain is quality of life. If the teeth are severely infected or there is severe gingivitis and gum disease going on in the mouth, the quality of life is poor as the animal experiences discomfort and pain constantly. Older pet

What is involved in a referral to Sydney Pet Dentistry?

Once the appointment is arranged things are pretty straight forward. Don’t feed your pet on the morning of the consultation in case general anaesthesia is required. If possible make sure your pet goes to the toilet beforehand as well. Aim to arrive approximately 10 mins prior to

Pet teeth cleaning – what can I tell clients about homecare plans for their pets?

Regular pet teeth cleaning at home – just a few minutes a day – can improve your pet’s health, improve that bad dog breath, make them more comfortable, saving you money on treatment. So…how do I care for my pet’s teeth?

Are you a specialist veterinary dentist?

Christine is not a specialist veterinary dentist. She has done further study and training in small animal dentistry, and has limited her clinical practice to this field since 2007. Christine attained membership of the Veterinary Dentistry Chapter of the Australian College of Veterinar

Cleaning dog teeth seems like hard work! Do people really brush their pets’ teeth?

Cleaning dog teeth is not as hard as you think. Cats can also be more co-operative than you expect! So why would you want to brush your pet’s teeth? Periodontal disease is why we clean pets’ teeth Periodontal disease is caused by plaque, a bacterial biofilm that adheres to

Why would anyone consider dental braces in dogs or cats?

Dog dental braces is a topic we are often asked about. Cosmetic considerations may be important to some owners, however the real focus of veterinary orthodontics is on making pets with badly positioned teeth comfortable. Animals do not need a perfect or ‘correct’ bite, but

Pet root canal treatment? Why consider trying to save teeth when we can extract them?

Extraction is a option for relieving pain and infection, and is therefore far more humane than allowing animals to suffer with a sore or unhealthy mouth. In many situations there are other treatment options available that can both relieve pain and infection, while preserving dental fu

Are there any guidelines available for providing dental services to our patients?

The Australian Veterinary Dental Society, a special interest group of the Australian Veterinary Association, has recently produced some guidelines to clarify to the profession and if necessary, to the public, what is considered to be a professionally performed dental examination and t

What exactly are feline resorptive lesions?

Feline resorptive lesions (otherwise known as feline odontoclastic resorptive lesions or neck lesions) are a very common cause of dental pain in our feline friends. In fact, studies have shown that once cats reach middle age, at least half of them will have one or more resorptive lesi

What to do if you see a broken pet tooth

Broken dog teeth (and cat teeth) should be assessed by your vet as soon as they are noticed. If the fracture is fairly small and does not expose the pulp (living tissue inside the tooth) there is a reasonable chance the tooth will survive. However, such teeth should be monitored close